Monthly Archives: April 2014

The Supreme Court’s real technology problem

I spent a lot of the last week shaking my head at the commentary on the Supreme Court and its (lack of) technical expertise. Much of the criticism came in response to the oral arguments in Aereo, and broke down in two areas: it either misunderstood the nature of Supreme Court oral arguments and their […]

Mini Metro fan art: SF BART

I’ve been playing a lot of Mini Metro, a (still alpha) transit-planning puzzle game. It’s been recommended to me a dozen times by people who know how I feel about transit maps, and that element of the game is really great, but it’s also just a lot of fun to play. In any case, it’s […]

Where is the copyright maximalist dystopian sci-fi?

Have copyright maximalists ever written dystopian science-fiction about a future where free culture wins? After all, there’s plenty of science-fiction in the copyfight. Whole subgenres of utopian stories assume a post-scarcity world facilitated by tech like super-advanced 3D printing and unhindered by law. Similarly, there are plenty of stories that describe a dystopian future where […]

Supreme Court Clouds (2014)

Here’s a supercut of audio from April 22, 2014’s Supreme Court argument in ABC v. Aereo featuring every use (in order) of the word “cloud.” The video track is from Cory Arcangel’s “Super Mario Clouds” (2002). Here’s a version of the audio only (yes, I put my cloud sound on SoundCloud):

Netflick, Hulu

Here’s Justice Sonia Sotomayor, at 0:50:59 of the Aereo oral arguments, saying the word “Netflick.”