Monthly Archives: May 2014

Accepting Amazon’s DRM makes it impossible to challenge its monopoly

Amazon was the target of some well-deserved criticism this week for making the anti-customer move of suspending sales of books published by Hachette, reportedly as a hardball tactic in its ongoing negotiations over ebook revenue splits. In an excellent article, Mathew Ingram connects this with other recent bad behavior by Internet giants leveraging their monopolies. […]

Do Androids Dream of Electric Free Speech?

A new paper called “Do Androids Dream of Electric Free Speech?” argues that legal scholars could benefit from looking more to science fiction works when writing about concepts like copyright, censorship, and privacy. It’s an interesting paper, and spends time going into some theories of why sci-fi is relevant as well as examining the issues […]

Supreme Court Clouds media mentions

My short audio project Supreme Court Clouds (2014) has gotten a little bit of media attention (largely on the back of my, y’know, real observations about the Supreme Court and technology.) It was described in a recent Reuters story, along with a quote from me about the level of tech-savvy in the Supreme Court. It […]