Tag Archives: privacy

Tuesday: Oakland City Hall to fight the Domain Awareness Center

This Tuesday, November 19, Oakland City Council will hear comments on its plan to spend $7 million of DHS money on a “Domain Awareness Center” that would aggregate surveillance data from many different channels about the residents of Oakland. The New York Times wrote up some of the privacy concerns people have with such a […]

Scalia’s powerful dissent in Maryland v. King

The Supreme Court released a decision earlier this month that I think history will reflect on as a mistake. In Maryland v. King, the Court held that suspects arrested for “major crimes” could have their DNA collected and stored. I rarely find myself in agreement with Scalia, but I think this quote from him sums […]

“Where was the outrage then?” ask the trolls

Working on drones, and increasingly in the conversation around Google Glass, I keep hearing a common refrain from people who don’t understand other people’s concerns. “There are surveillance cameras on every corner in major cities, helicopters with cameras overhead, and constant tracking in a million other ways,” the argument goes, “and where is the outrage […]

SXSW panel proposals

I’ve submitted two proposals for panels at next year’s South by Southwest festival in Austin. I really hope one of them gets picked. The PanelPicker is currently open for voting (I’d appreciate your votes!) and then I’ll know later this year if I’m in. Ebooks: A Coming War for the Soul of the Library will […]

Public transit and lawful access

Eric King recently posted a link to London’s Oyster Card FAQ page explaining Transport for London’s policy on requests for information from police — it rejects 5-10% of requests for providing insufficient information. It inspired me to look up Clipper Card’s policy. As I suspected, it doesn’t report any similar numbers, but it says in […]